Innovative traffic calming that helps save lives

A responsive traffic calming device that alters its firmness based on the velocity of the vehicle passing over it.

TransCalm - Responsive Speed Control

Fast and efficient bolt down installation

Encourages controlled, consistent driving speeds

Significantly reduces the risk of vehicle damage

TransCalm - Responsive Speed Control

Highly visible - Quick & easy to install - Transferable

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TransCalm, the road hump evolved

TransCalm Speed Testing at The University of Manchester

Testing_the_TransCalmA TransCalm road hump has been installed at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering at The University of Manchester. The new test site will be used to gather further data illustrating how the TransCalm alters its firmness in response to the velocity of the vehicle passing over the unit.

Preliminary tests looking at vertical acceleration verses vehicle speed were carried out on the day of installation by the development team, David Franklin (Mallatite Ltd), Stephen Tyler (Pell Frischmann), and Dr Iain Dupere (University of Manchester).

TransClam_fiesta

TransCalm_FiestaVehicle: 2013 Ford Fiesta 5dr, representing a typical small family car.
Location: The University of Manchester (August 2014).

Methodology: A TransCalm unit was installed on a service road at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. The vehicle was driven over the TransCalm unit repeatedly at each prescribed speed to achieve an average reading. Accelerometers connected to data loggers installed within the vehicle were used to record the data.


Results:

  • The graph illustrates the average measurements for vertical acceleration (discomfort) taken for each of the speeds: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 & 35 mph.
  • The shaded blue area on the graph represents the comfort zone <0.7g. Ideally occupants of vehicles travelling at a responsible, “safe speed” 20mph, should experience levels of discomfort less than 0.7g of vertical acceleration. Correspondingly, discomfort should then increase beyond 0.7g for drivers exceeding the safe speed.
  • Vertical acceleration greater than 0.7g is considered uncomfortable.
  • As you can see from the tests, speeds up to circa 20mph are shown to be comfortable with the firmness increasing from a negligible 0.2g at 5mph to just over 0.7g at 20mph. At 20mph the valves inside the unit close and the firmness increases to a point of nearly 1.5g at 25mph and over 1.9g at 35mph.
  • The maximum speed for the test was 35 mph, but from the trend of the results it would suggest that the level of discomfort would increase, though at a slower rate, beyond 35 mph.

TransClam_Passat

TransCalm_PassatVehicle: 2012 Volkswagen 5dr Estate, representing a typical large family car.
Location: The University of Manchester (August 2014).

Methodology: A TransCalm unit was installed on a service road at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. The vehicle was driven over the TransCalm unit repeatedly at each prescribed speed to achieve an average reading. Accelerometers connected to data loggers installed within the vehicle were used to record the data.


Results:

  • As you can see from the tests, speeds up to circa 20mph are shown to be comfortable with the firmness increasing from 0.4g at 5mph to just under 0.6g at 20mph. At 20mph the valves inside the unit close and the firmness increases to a point of nearly 1.0g at 25mph and over 1.3g at 35mph.

The maximum speed for the test was 35 mph, but from the trend of the results it would suggest that the level of discomfort would increase, though at a slower rate, beyond 35 mph.

Conclusion:

  • Both the Fiesta and the Passat, when driven over the TransCalm at the “safe speed” and below, experience minimal discomfort.
  • Once the “safe speed” is exceeded, the level of vertical acceleration for both vehicles becomes uncomfortable.
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